A larger-than-life way to give thanks

 

This month saw the launch of our 2014 Thankful Miners Project, an experiment that gave the Miner community an opportunity to reflect, appreciate and express their gratitude. Standing 4 feet tall, the 3-D S&T logo provided a canvas for more than 500 students, faculty and staff members to share their thankfulness. From parental support and caring faculty, to teammates and roommates, Miners found ways to share their gratefulness for things big and small.

We’re thankful for the ingenuity and creativity shown by all members of the Miner family – our students, faculty, staff, alumni and friends. We’re especially grateful to S&T’s Rock Mechanics and Explosives Research Center and the Student Design and Experiential Learning Center for their efforts to make the 3-D logo possible.

While we’re on the subject of gratitude, we invite you to join in. Tell us what you’re thankful for this season and you could see your tweet, photo or comment included here. To share your expressions of gratitude with us, use the #ThankfulMiners hashtag on Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

2014_thankful_miners_discover

Students, faculty and staff alike shared their thankfulness on this 3-D S&T logo, changing its canvas from white to Miner green. Photo by Sam O’Keefe

The essential creative experience

The essential creative experience

Each week when Laurie Myers steps into her Castleman Hall classroom to teach Art 3001, she is more than a lecturer. She is a guide for students exploring digital art, problem-solving and professional development. … [Continue reading]

Carrying the torch

Carrying the torch

Once a wing defender in the early days of Miner soccer, Bob Zdvorak is back in the Missouri S&T soccer complex – this time in the stands cheering on his sons, who are the first second-generation players in the history of the program. … [Continue reading]

Remaking America

Re-making America

Over the past decade, many of the world’s top corporations and industries have called on Missouri S&T researchers to improve existing manufacturing processes and develop new approaches and materials. “We’re always looking for ways to create … [Continue reading]

A league of his own

A league of his own

Before he became an author and a history professor, Russell D. Buhite was a minor league first baseman and outfielder for the New York Giants, the Baltimore Orioles and the Washington Senators. … [Continue reading]

Getting down to business

2014_mulina_elizabeth_discover

Coming into Missouri S&T, Elizabeth Mulina of O’Fallon, Mo., knew she wanted to work in a business field after she graduated. With an interest in the psychology of marketing, Mulina says she’s looking forward to eventually working in … [Continue reading]

Saying good riddance to soggy buns

Saying good riddance to soggy buns

The solution to the soggy bun epidemic may be the brainchild of Missouri S&T freshman Tyler Richards and his friend, Jonathan Thompson. And it all started as an assignment for their high school Project Lead the Way capstone course, Engineering … [Continue reading]

For family, for country, for the future

For family, for country, for the future

Nearly everything Luis Pereira does, he does for future Hispanic college students, especially his four-year-old brother, Johann. … [Continue reading]

Extreme engineering

Extreme engineering

Through the Enabling Materials for Extreme Environments signature area, Bill Fahrenholtz and Greg Hilmas are testing the thermal and mechanical properties of  ceramics to find out what makes them stronger. They are investigating … [Continue reading]

The turf is always greener

The grass is always greener

Last fall, the intramural field near Missouri S&T’s Gale Bullman Multi-Purpose Building was torn up to make way for the campus’s geothermal energy project. Rather than reseed the field, Missouri S&T students voted to use $1.8 million in … [Continue reading]

Championing STEM for minorities

Championing STEM for minorities

Emily Hernandez didn't wait until college to start recruiting fellow minorities to science, technology, engineering and mathematics (STEM) fields. She started as an eighth-grader during a University of Memphis camp called Girls Experiencing … [Continue reading]

%d bloggers like this: